Story Central 3: Goanna and the Moon

It has been awhile since I have written about my current students. They have been working hard and making me proud. But over the past four months, my blogging has been focused on the backlog of stories and unpublished galleries from my time in China. 

This past week, I wrote over 4,000 words about various Christmas experiences in China. I took a collection of 600 photos and narrowed then down to 120. I then uploaded about 60 of them. I was impressed that I could condense the pictures to some key images. I started out by writing about a barbecue event one year. That four-year-old memory unearthed deeper memories. Once they started cascading, I had no choice but to let the words find their way onto the virtual paper of my blog into three separate entries

Because editing and archiving are so important, I got wrapped up in the old photo collections and stories and let work just be work. I did record another class's stories and then posted them on facebook. I decided to not do anything else with that material. But it is my Saturday & Sunday morning class that stands out.

We are only supposed to complete three units, of the nine-unit book, each term. But this class is so quick and they grasp the stories without delay so that we were able to complete four units each term. The book is called Story Central and is a lot of fun to teach. The grammar and vocabulary all relate to a 9 to 12-panel story. I would diagram the grammar and show them hot it applies to the story. Even though they could theoretically use simpler grammar in the stories, I emphasize the idea of target grammar. This is the grammar that they need to apply to the story for no other reason than it is a challenge. This class responds to challenges. They read the stories and retold them without much trouble.

In the third term, there was only one unit left to teach. The term lasts 10 weeks. After the 2-week lesson for unit 9, I decided to have the students pick one of their favorite stories. Each student had to pick four sequential sections of the story. Then I had them practice retelling their section of the story, draw a four-panel picture, and remember their part of the story. 

I recorded their effort and then stitched the footage in the video below: