We are the music makers,
And we are the dreamers of dreams,
Wandering by lone sea-breakers,
And sitting by desolate streams;—
World-losers and world-forsakers,
On whom the pale moon gleams:
Yet we are the movers and shakers
Of the world for ever, it seems.
 English poet Arthur O'Shaughnessy and first published in 1873

Few movies capture the mind's magic of imagination and and value maintaining that side of oneself quite like Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971). Gene Wilder's intelligence and sensitivity make him perfect for stepping into the role as the guide who tests the lucky children on a tour through his factory. 

One of the lessons is that, even at a young age, these children are corrupted and so they are unable to be trusted with other people's dreams. They steal, jump headlong despite warnings, and over consume, In other words, they are too selfish.

If only they were to learn how to develop their own dreams, they wouldn't be so tempted to grab at other people's dreams. With a fertile imagination, they would have an abundant resource to pull from on their own. They would, however, have to learn how to protect what they have, develop it, and respect other people's dreams. After that? Well, find like-minded people, of course.

And finding like-minded people would be treasured once you realize how often it is not the case.